How To Make Your Own Makeup!

Guest Post by Jordan

Do you ever hit the store to replenish your favorite eyeshadow, glance at the price, and sigh, wishing there was a cheaper way to achieve your favorite look? Or have you ever randomly checked out the ingredient list on your most-used products and wondered what ninety percent of the stuff was, and whether or not it was actually good for your skin? Although the makeup industry is vast, and on average costs us about fifteen grand over the course of a lifetime, commercial makeup products are not the end-all, be-all in terms of beauty – especially if you like to look great, save money, and be kind to your body. Below are a handful of tips and beginner recipes for making your very own products from the stuff in your kitchen. DIY projects are so in right now – so get reading, and then start mixing!

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Cream Foundation

The best organic DIY foundation we found is by far the most intense recipe in this list, so if you can make this one work, you’re good to go! To start with, set up your double boiler, or throw a glass bowl over a pot of water on the stove if you don’t have one. Bring the water to a simmer, making sure the bowl doesn’t actually touch the water, and use your kitchen scale to measure and throw in 1 ½ ounces almond oil, an ounce of shea butter, half an ounce of cocoa butter, half an ounce worth of beeswax chips, and ⅛ teaspoon of vitamin E. Stir this concoction until it is melted, remove from heat and allow to cool, and then whisk in half an ounce of zinc oxide (found at most herbal and organic specialty shops) and ⅛ teaspoon of cinnamon. Finally, to get the color right, start with adding half a tablespoon of cocoa powder, mix, and test it on your skin. Work your way up to the right shade with an additional ½ teaspoon of cocoa at a time, and once it looks just right, allow it to cool completely and store safely in a clean jar.

Eyebrow Filler

For this one, you’ll need more almond oil and cocoa powder, cornstarch, activated charcoal powder, and a small jar to store your mixture in once you’ve finished. Combine 1 ½ teaspoons of the almond oil and 2 ½ teaspoons of cocoa powder, and mix well to create your base and identify whether or not the color needs to be darker for your brows. If so, add the charcoal in tiny increments and stir after each until the color is just a shade darker than what you desire. Finally, add one teaspoon of cornstarch to thicken the mixture and bring the color back to the tone you want. You can play with adding more cornstarch or charcoal to even out the color, thickness, and texture. Give it a final few stirs, and store in a tightly-sealed, sanitized jar, applying with a thin brow brush as you would the commercial equivalent.

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Blush and Bronzer

DIY blush is even easier, and the bronzer just requires an extra ingredient. Because this recipe is dry, it will obviously keep for much longer than the cream and oil-based recipes you can use, as long as you keep it safe from moisture and humidity. To whip up your own batch, you’ll want to toss together ¼ cup of cornstarch and between one and three teaspoons of hibiscus powder, depending upon how rosy you like your blush to be. You can also replace the cornstarch with arrowroot powder for a softer (but still natural) base that will work harder at absorbing the sweat and oils from your face. Take it a step further and mix in between ½ and a whole teaspoon of ground cinnamon to give the mixture a bronzy look. Again, play combining different amounts of the hibiscus and cinnamon to make the color all your own.

The most important thing to recognize when beginning to create beauty products at home is that, depending on what you use to make them, they will not last as long as the commercial products you’re used to buying. They will also not contain the dyes and preservatives that typically keep bacteria from thriving in your store-bought containers, which is why we need to take extra precautions to ensure that your concoctions will keep well. To do this, we need to eliminate the possibility of contamination by using only sterilized jars when storing any DIY recipes, and applying these products with clean swabs and brushes instead of fingers. You’ll also want to keep all homemade makeup away from light and excess moisture, both of which can promote the growth of unwanted bacteria.

It’s also a great idea to mix up your preferred recipes in small amounts that you’ll use up within a few days. Creating bulk batches of any homemade product leaves too much time for them to harbor bacteria and expire, especially if your recipe is wet or calls for any naturally perishable food items. So when mixing at home, consider the shelf life of the ingredients you’re using, and apply that timeframe to how long you will have to use what you’re making. If you struggle to find the time to do multiple mini batches a week, try adding some natural antioxidants and anti-microbials like Vitamin E and coconut oil to prolong the shelf life of your creations. And ultimately, if something seems off, don’t use it. Your products may separate on their own over time, much like organic nut butters, and can be stirred to restore them to the appropriate texture. But if the smell is off, or you notice discoloration even after mixing, it’s best to toss them and make another batch.

Author bio –
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Jordan is the beauty and brains behind Beautifully Alive! She loves eating healthy and trying new recipes.The self-proclaimed Zumba Queen has a passion for beauty products and loves reading new books. She’s always down for a DIY project!

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